Does Rain Really Affect Bone Aches?

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Do you know someone who thinks they can predict when it’s about to rain? Maybe they sometimes grab their knee and ominously whisper, “A storm is coming…”

It might sound crazy, but multiple people report body aches during rainy or cold days. So, when their bones act up, they attribute it to a nearing climate change. And with so many people claiming this, there must be some truth to it.

A Harvard Study

Well, a recent Harvard Medical School study questioned that reality and took to studying more than a decade’s worth of Medicare records. Analyzing over 11 million doctor visits between 2008 and 2012, they matched that visit information with rainfall data from US weather stations.

They figured if rainy days increased ache pains, then it would lead to people going to the doctor’s office that day. Researchers found that complaints of joint or back pain did not change on rainy days when compared to sunny days.

So, is the relationship between rain and achy joints just an hold wise-tale?

More than Just a Wise-tale?

Hold onto your knees, because the study wasn’t entirely conclusive. It did not take into account the people who self-medicate or care at home. Plus, what if someone called the doctor’s office the day that it rained? What’s the chance that they would actually get a doctor’s appointment on that same exact day?

Even going further, the study only compared rainy and sunny days. What about temperature?

Research may be sparse, but the relationship between rain and joints is a general phenomenon. Some researchers believe the explanation is pretty simple — a change in barometric pressure (related to weather) or weight of the air presses down on some people, causing their own weight to exert more pressure on their bones.

The Injury Recovery Pack

Whether or not there’s a concrete medical explanation, people do experience real pain and aches. If you or someone you know needs some relief, have them check out our NEW Injury Recovery Pack.

The Injury Recovery Pack naturally helps ease joint and injury-related pain:

  • Joint Flex: Uses a variety of natural herbs to support the body’s response to inflammation and stimulate the rebuilding of connective tissue
  • Apothe-Cherry: Uses the power of tart cherry’s antioxidants to help support healthy joint support
  • Super Xanthin: Uses antioxidants and superfoods to help reduce lactic acid build-up, improve athletic recovery time and reduce muscle tissue damage
  • EASE Spray: Supports the body’s response to inflammation and pain

Happy recovery!

More about the Harvard Medical School study:

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2017-12/hms-tfi121117.php

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